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HERES WHERE YOU MAY FIND A BRIEF DESCRIPTION ABOUT A DISH, IT’S ORIGIN, AND SOME INFORMATION ABOUT THE CULTURE A DISH CAME FROM. YOU MAY ALSO FIND THE RECIPES TO ACCOMPANY THESE FOODS WITH THE TAB LABELED WITH IT’S SPECIFIC CULTURE.

DRUNKEN NOODLES

INGREDIENTS:

STIR-FRY INGREDIENTS:

  • 8 ounces (dry) rice stick noodles
  • 2 Tablespoons peanut or vegetable oil, divided
  • 1 pound raw jumbo shrimp, peeled and deveined (*or you can sub in your desired protein or tofu)
  • 4 cups (packed) Chinese broccoli, chopped into bite-sized pieces with the stems and leaves separated
  • 1 red bell pepper, cored and cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  • 3 green onions, chopped into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 eggs, whisked
  • 1 1/2 cups packed fresh Thai basil leaves
  • stir-fry sauce (see below)
  • (optional: lime wedges, for serving)

STIR-FRY SAUCE:

  • 2-3 Tablespooons low-sodium soy sauce
  • 2 Tablespoons oyster sauce
  • 2 Tablespoons fish sauce
  • 1 Tablespoon sweet dark soy sauce
  • 1 Tablespoon Thai garlic chili sauce, or more/less to taste

DIRECTIONS:

TO MAKE THE DRUNKEN NOODLES (PAD KEE MAO):

  1. Prepare noodles al dente according to package instructions.  (Or if there are no instructions, I recommend placing the noodles in a large mixing bowl and pouring boiling water on top of them until they are submerged.  Wait 3-5 minutes until they are soft and al dente, then drain the water and set the noodles aside until ready to use.)
  2. Meanwhile, heat 1 Tablespoon oil in a large saute pan or wok over high heat.  Stir in the shrimp and cook for 4-6 minutes, flipping and stirring occasionally, until they are just cooked through.  (They should be pink and no longer translucent.)  Transfer the shrimp to a separate plate and set aside.
  3. Add the remaining 1 Tablespoon oil to the saute pan or wok.  Add the Chinese broccoli stems and red bell pepper, and saute for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally.  Add the garlic and green onions and continue sauteing for an additional 2 minutes, stirring frequently.
  4. Push the vegetables up along the side(s) of the saute pan, leaving a hole in the center.  Add the eggs, and quickly scramble them, stirring occasionally, until they are cooked.  (Alternately, you can also scramble the eggs beforehand and set aside until ready to use, or cook them simultaneously in another saute pan, if your current pan isn’t big enough.)
  5. Add in the cooked noodles, shrimp, fresh Thai basil, and stir-fry sauce, and give the mixture a good toss until everything is combined.  Continue cooking for 2 more minutes, tossing frequently.  Taste, and season with salt and pepper if needed.
  6. Serve immediately, garnished with lime wedges if desired.

TO MAKE THE STIR-FRY SAUCE:

  1. Whisk all ingredients together until combined.  Taste, and add more garlic chili sauce (or any of the other sauces) if you would like.

Recipe from gimmesomeoven

THAI ICED TEA

YIELD: SERVES 4-6

TOTAL TIME: 1 HOUR

Please read the post about this Thai tea recipe. It discusses the brands and different methods on how to make it to get the orange color, as well as photographs to illustrate the process. When we made our Thai Tea mix from the Pantai Thai Tea Mix bag, we reduced their suggested sugar amount by about 20% to our own personal taste. For those of you who prefer an organic version with coconut milk,that option is below too.

In the recipe there are two options for creating your Thai Iced Tea – Option #1 Using a purchased Pantai Thai Tea Mixand Option #2 – Making it from scratch using organic black tea bags and spices.

INGREDIENTS:

OPTION #1 – THAI TEA MIX INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 cup (80g) Pantai Thai Tea Mix
  • 4 cups (960ml) water
  • 3/4 cup (150g) granulated sugar
  • about 1 cup (240ml) half and half (some folks also use coconut milk, whole milk, sweetened condensed milk)
  • ice

OPTION #2 – USING ORGANIC TEA BAGS INGREDIENTS:

  • 4 cups (960ml) water
  • 4 organic black tea bags
  • 3/4 cup (150g) granulated sugar
  • 2 anise stars
  • 1 green cardamom pod, smashed
  • 2 whole cloves
  • about 1 cup (240ml) half and half (some folks also use coconut milk, whole milk, sweetened condensed milk)
  • ice

DIRECTIONS:

OPTION #1 – THAI TEA MIX DIRECTIONS:

  1. Bring water to boil and add the thai tea mix. Add sugar and gently stir to completely dissolve sugar. Gently boil tea for about 3 minutes. Remove from heat.
  2. Allow tea to steep for at least 30 minutes and allow it to cool. The more concentrated the tea flavor, the better the Thai tea tastes.
  3. If you are using the Thai tea mix, strain the tea leaves. Set finished Thai tea aside to cool.
  4. You can make this ahead of time and have the Thai tea chilling in the fridge. We usually like to make this tea mix one day ahead.
  5. Fill glasses with ice and pour in Thai tea leaving enough room to fill in your half and half (or other creamer). For an 8 oz. glass we like to add about 2-3 tablespoons of half and half for a creamier flavor.

OPTION #2 – USING ORGANIC TEA BAGS DIRECTIONS:

  1. Bring water to boil and add the tea bags, sugar, anise starts, cardamom pod and cloves. Stir until all the sugar disolves. Gently boil tea for about 3 minutes. Remove from heat.
  2. Allow tea to steep for at least 30 minutes and allow it to cool. The more concentrated the tea flavor, the better the Thai tea tastes. We prefer to allow the tea bags to seep for about 2 hours for maximum flavor. During this time, the thai tea can cool.
  3. Remove the tea bags and spoon out the anise starts, cardamom pod and cloves. If tea is still warm, we will refrigerate it so it can be chilled.
  4. You can make this ahead of time and have the organic Thai tea chilling in the fridge.
  5. Fill glasses with ice and pour in organic Thai tea leaving enough room to fill in your half and half (or other creamer). For an 8 oz. glass we like to add about 2-3 tablespoons of half and half for a creamier flavor.

Recipe from whiteonricecouple

Shrimp Summer Rolls

In Asian culture there is something significantly similar in everything they do. It’s a principle of design and it applies to the food as well. Nature is their inspiration. In Japanese cuisine, it takes a balanced and refined form. Everything is clean, orderly and colorful. Shrimp rolls are commonly served with peanut sauce.

Ingredients

  • About 14 round rice paper wrappers About 1 cup fresh mint leaves
  • About 7 oz – 200 g cooked shrimps, peeled and sliced in half lengthwise (I weighted them before peeling them)
  • About 14 lettuce leaves
  • About 2 cups cooked rice vermicelli, cooled down
  • About 3 cups fresh bean sprouts

For the sauce

  • 4 tbsp rice vinegar
  • 4 tbsp fish sauce
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed (optional)
  • 1 tbsp grated carrots (optional)

Directions

  1. Start by softening the rice papers. I like to use two rice papers per roll, just to make sure they don’t break. Fill a large bowl with warm water. Dip two rice papers (or one) very carefully and gradually for about 1 minute, until totally soften. Lay rice papers on a clean cloth. (See the pictures, they explain the process way better than I do).
  2. Arrange about 4 beautiful mint leaves at the bottom of the rice paper, then about 4 shrimp halves. Top with a lettuce leaf, a small handful of vermicelli and a small handful of bean sprouts (there’s no photo of the bean sprouts part because I wasn’t able to find any the day I took the pics!). Add additional mint leaves. That’s the moment when you can actually add pretty much anything you have in mind -and in you fridge- (think cilantro, peanuts, chicken, parsley…). Top with a second lettuce leaf. Always keep about 2 inches uncovered on each side.
  3. Now the rolling part. Fold uncovered sides inward, then tightly roll the rice paper, as shown on the pics. Repeat with remaining ingredients.
  4. Prepare the sauce. In a sauce pan, combine rice vinegar, fish sauce, water and sugar. Heat until sugar is dissolved, then let cool completely. Add garlic and carrots. It keeps about a week in the fridge.
  5. Serve your spring rolls with the sauce and enjoy!

IMG_9972.JPG

http://notenoughcinnamon.com/2013/03/17/how-to-make-vietnamese-fresh-spring-rolls-step-by-step-recipe/

http://www.allasiafresh.com/Japan.php#

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